Do Trucks Have to Stop at Every Weigh Station and Why?

Do Box Trucks Have To Stop At Weigh Stations?

Are you about to make a long shift using box trucks but worried about weigh stations?  You have reached the best place!

This article will discuss if box trucks need to stop at weigh stations and what factors can lead you to stop at weigh stations. Here is what you need to know about box trucks and weigh stations!

Graphic of a truck weigh station

Must Box Trucks Stop At Weigh Stations?

If you happen to own a box truck and want to know whether you have to make a stop at the weighing station, the answer is, it depends!

Generally, box truck drivers do not need to stop at a weigh station, as driving a box truck is not considered a commercial move. 

While, states like Alaska, Arkansas, and California require box trucks or any truck carrying a weight of 10,000 pounds or more to stop at the weighing stations. 

If you wish not to stop at the weighing station, keep their truck’s weight in check! And if your rental truck weighs more than the gross combination weight rating, you need to stop at a weigh station. 

Toll gate with roof

Why Do Trucks Have to Stop at Weigh Station?

Do trucks have to stop at every weigh station and why? All the states in the USA have a varied set of rules and regulations.

And when it comes to weighing stations, all trucks must stop at a weighing station. Especially the commercial ones!

The weigh stations check the weight that the trucks carry and look if they are operating correctly on roads without hampering the infrastructure.  

This regulation is based on the GVWR (Gross Vehicle Weight Rating), which is the maximum weight limit a truck can carry.

Truck drivers need to stop at the weighing station if the GVWR exceeds 10,000 lbs or more. As per weigh station rules, vehicles weighing more than the registered gross weight need to stop.

Truck weigh station road sign

Do Moving Trucks Have to Stop at Weigh Stations

Are you wondering if rental trucks have to stop at weigh stations, or not? Most moving trucks are rental trucks, and as with all rental trucks, they expect to stop at weigh stations on the highway. 

Yes, all rental and moving trucks have to stop at weigh stations. All weigh stations have signs that tell you in plain English that “all rental trucks must stop for inspection.” This procedure is also in line with CVC section 410.

These weigh stations perform the primary duty of ensuring that moving trucks do not exceed the weight limit for the highway route as they go through official rental truck scale.

Therefore, the moving truck weigh station prevent unsafe and overweight trucks from plying the highways and moving from one state to another. This action makes the roads a lot safer for all drivers on them.

What Trucks Have to Stop at Weigh Stations

Yes most trucks must stop at weight station but largely depend on each state rules and requirement. In Nebraska, medium pickup truck are not required to stop, while few states require hauling pick to weigh.

Look below table showing highway rules by different states and their weigh station requirements for all sizes of trucks including big rigs and rental trucks.

Weigh Station Requirements by States

Here is a table with the weight station requirements followed all over the United States –

STATES REQUIREMENTS
Alabama No
Alaska Yes, the driver needs to stop if the GVWR exceeds 10,000 lbs.
Arizona Yes, the truck driver needs to stop if the GVWR exceeds 10,000 lbs.
Arkansas Yes, the driver needs to stop if the GVWR exceeds 10,000 lbs.
California Yes, as per CVC Section 410, any moving truck is considered a motor truck; hence, they must stop
Colorado Yes, the driver needs to stop if the GVWR exceeds 26,000 pounds.
Connecticut No 
Delaware No 
Florida It depends, for instance, if the truck carrier agricultural products, the driver needs to stop at Agricultural Inspection Station.
Georgia Yes, the driver needs to stop if the GVWR exceeds 10,000 lbs.
Hawaii Yes, the driver needs to stop if the GVWR exceeds 10,000 lbs.
Idaho No 
Illinois No 
Indiana Yes, the driver needs to halt at the weigh station if the GVWR exceeds 10,000 lbs.
Iowa Yes, the driver needs to stop if the GVWR exceeds 10,000 lbs.
Kansas Yes, vehicles that have truck registration must stop!
Kentucky No
Louisiana No
Maryland No
Maine No
Massachusetts No 
Michigan No 
Minnesota Yes, the driver needs to stop if the GVWR exceeds 10,000 pounds.
Mississippi No
Missouri No
Montana Yes, the driver needs to stop if the GVWR exceeds 8,000 pounds or carrying agricultural products or vehicles.
Nebraska Yes, the driver needs to stop if the GVWR exceeds one ton.
Nevada No
New Hampshire No
New Jersey Yes, the driver needs to stop if the GVWR exceeds 10,001 pounds.
New Mexico Yes, the driver needs to stop at weigh station if the weight limits exceed 26,001 pounds.
New York No
North Carolina No
North Dakota Yes, the driver needs to stop at weigh station if the truck scales exceed 10,000 lbs.
Ohio Yes, the driver needs to stop if the weight range exceeds 10,000 lbs.
Oklahoma No
Oregon Yes, the driver needs to stop if the GVWR exceeds 26,000 pounds.
Pennsylvania The size of the does not matter; all trucks must stop
Rhode Island No
South Carolina If the truck appears to be carrying something unlawful, the department asks the driver to stop at a weigh station
South Dakota Yes, the driver needs to stop if the weight restriction is not maintained, and exceeds 8,000 pounds.
Tennessee No
Texas No
Utah No
Vermont No
Virginia Yes, the driver needs to stop if the GVWR exceeds 7,500 pounds.
Washington No 
West Virginia No
Wisconsin Yes, the driver needs to stop if the GVWR exceeds 10,000 pounds.
Wyoming Depends, as random trucks are picked for inspection.

Benefits and Purpose of Weigh Stations

Many are new truckers often asked what are weigh stations for? Weigh stations for trucks are found along highways in the country.

However, contrary to popular belief, they perform a task that supersedes just checking the weight of moving trucks.

They are pivotal to ensuring that truck drivers are not overworked, but alert and awake to continue their journey.  They also make sure that all commercial trucks obey the set-down federal regulations.

Furthermore, weigh stations often run a surprise check of the truck driver’s log. The essence of this check is to know the state of the driver.

Many things come into play here. How long the driver has been on the road, and how many breaks he has had. This check is necessary, and it helps prevent truck drivers from overworking themselves.

When the rest periods of a driver are too short, he may fall asleep on the wheels, leading to an accident. Therefore, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) is deeply committed to looking out for fatigued driving amongst truck drivers.

They do this by keeping an eye on the rest hours of truck drivers. If a truck driver is found guilty of fatigue driving, the driver and the company he works under will receive a fine.

Van driver in a weigh station graphic

Do Uhauls have to stop at weigh stations?

As we stated above rental and moving trucks are required to stop to be weighted by most states. In California, it is expressly stated that “Rental trucks can be a U-Haul, Ryder, Sears, Budget, Enterprise… according to CVC Section 410, and must stop at the weigh stations”

The exception maybe for a rental pickup, but may be required to if the rental truck is fixed with utility bed or complete flat bed.

What Does Truck Bypass Weigh Station Mean?

The truck bypass weigh station is a program is such a solution that allows vehicles and carriers to skip mobile inspections all over the United States. 

This solution, also known as truck scale bypass was specifically designed to optimize the inspection site functionality and reward the carriers with nice and decent scores. 

If you sign up for this program and qualify for the ISS (Inspection Selection System) score, all your drivers can or may have the right to drive past the weigh stations or inspection sites compliantly. 

Frequently Asked Questions

How to avoid the weigh stations?

If you intend to avoid weighing stations, here is what you can do –

Method #1 Use a Different Route

  • Plan a different route
  • Locate all the weighing stations 
  • Alter the route so that you avoid or bypass the weigh station.

Method #2 Drive When You See the Weigh Station Closed

  • Locate the weigh stations on your route,
  • Pick an area where you can pull over your truck and get some rest,
  • Install and use weigh station applications that can help you see the status of the weigh station,
  • Once you find the weigh stations closed, proceed!

Do box trucks have to stop at Texas, Virginia, and Michigan weigh stations?

For states like Texas and Michigan, box trucks do not have to stop at weigh stations. But, in states like Virginia, you will have to stop at the station if the GVWR exceeds 7,500 pounds.

Why do some trucks not stop at weigh stations?

Some states have different sets of highway rules and do not feel the need to inspect a truck’s weight!  In these states, the trucks will not stop even if there is a weighing station.  Some trucks do not stop at weigh stations when the driver sees that the truck’s weight complies.

Conclusion

Now that you have read it here, you will have to use a moving truck when planning for a long haul.

Each state in the US has a different set of high regulations for vehicles, be it a private car or commercial trucks, and whether or not drivers must stop at weigh stations.

 The majority of the states require rental trucks to stop at weight inspection stations. If your truck’s GVWR exceeds 10,000 pounds, you need to stop at the weighing station.

Weigh station covered in snow